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June 2017 Grants

The Henry Luce Foundation is pleased to announce over $6,000,000 in grants to 21 institutions. These grants, awarded in five program areas, reflect the Foundation’s commitment to fostering international understanding and broadening opportunities for scholarly and public discourse.

Six grants from the American Art program will help strengthen permanent collections and support catalogue digitization efforts. These include an expansive gallery reinstallation, the conversion of a storage space into a public gallery, the creation and enhancement of three digital catalogues, and the development of an institutional archive to preserve the history of a center for American artists of African descent.

The Asia program awarded grants to three institutions. They will support a project to study philanthropy in China, a program on Taiwan and foreign policy, and an online collection of documentary films and educational resources that examine environmental issues in Asia.

One grant from the Higher Education program will be used to train college presidents to work more effectively with their boards; a second grant will enable completion of an innovative initiative in the humanities that engages experts and scholars from across diverse disciplines.

The Henry R. Luce Initiative on Religion in International Affairs awarded seven grants that demonstrate its commitment to interdisciplinary exchange and greater public understanding of religion in politics. Two grants contribute to the development of networks for collaborative scholarship and discussion of policy ideas. Two others support projects in the Middle East—one to study religious minorities and the other to convene dialogues on pluralism in the region. Three media-focused grants will enable the training of journalists reporting on Muslim women, encourage coverage of religion in diasporic communities, and help develop Islam-focused public radio programs.

The Theology Program awarded two grants that will support independent media projects, one to produce a podcast series on the work of chaplains and another to sustain a multimedia production on public theology. A third grant will allow for continued growth of a journal and forum dedicated to the field of interreligious studies.

Each of the grants awarded by the Foundation’s programs are described in more detail below:


American Art

The American Art Program has awarded six grants for projects focused on strengthening ties between collections, institutional identity, and the advancement of mission. The American Folk Art Museum will transform a portion of its Long Island City, Queens, headquarters into a public gallery for focus exhibitions from its permanent collection. The Norton Museum of Art will create an expansive reinstallation of its pre-contemporary American art collection and produce a publication charting the formation of the museum’s founding collection. Three documentation projects will underpin and enhance future permanent collection research and exhibitions: The Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, will expand information about their major collection of American drawings for its online catalogue; the Fuller Craft Museum will create the first digital collections database of its modern and contemporary crafts collection; and the Woodmere Art Museum will catalogue its extensive collection of works by the American Renaissance artist Violet Oakley and create an online resource on the artist. A major grant was awarded to The Studio Museum in Harlem to transform the records of its first fifty years into an institutional archive that will preserve documentation of its landmark exhibitions and unparalleled Artist in Residence program.

American Folk Art Museum, New York, NY—For a permanent collection gallery at AFAM’s Collections and Education Center in Long Island City. A two-year grant of $350,000.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution, New York, NY—To research and catalogue the American works on paper. A three-year grant of $190,000.

Fuller Craft Museum, Brockton, MA—To create an accessible digital catalogue of the permanent collection. A two-year grant of $72,000.

Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach, FL—To install expanded galleries of American art, and for the publication, Ralph Norton and His Museum. A two-year grant of $150,000.

The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, NY—To create The Studio Museum in Harlem Archives. A three-year grant of $690,000.

Woodmere Art Museum, Philadelphia, PA—To catalogue the Violet Oakley collection and create the Violet Oakley Digital Resource Center. A one-year grant of $160,000.


Asia

Three grants from the Asia Program reflect its goals to enhance understanding of Asia in the United States and to foster greater cultural and intellectual exchange between the United States and Asian countries. Indiana University’s Lilly School of Philanthropy will lead a research program on the philanthropic sector in the United States and China, while a grant to the Center for Strategic and International Studies will support a policy program aimed at cultivating greater understanding of Taiwan among the younger generation of American policy experts and scholars. Addressing the need for affordable, adaptable teaching resources on environmental issues in Asia, Face to Face Media and faculty from Whittier College will assemble and curate an online documentary film collection under the auspices of an award to the International Documentary Association.

Center for Strategic & International Studies, Washington, DC—For a policy program on Taiwan. A three-year grant of $355,000.

Indiana University, Bloomington, IN—For the U.S.-China Philanthropy Collaborative. A three-year grant of $330,000.

International Documentary Association, Los Angeles, CA—For Global Environmental Justice Documentaries: Focus on Asia, a project of Face to Face Media. A three-year grant of $155,000.


Higher Education

Two Higher Education grants illustrate the program’s longstanding commitments to train and support higher education leaders and to encourage transdisciplinary and transnational research. A grant to the Council of Independent Colleges provides support for the Presidents Governance Academy which equips college presidents to work more effectively with their boards. The second grant, awarded to Columbia University, will enable completion of the Making and Knowing Project (M&K). M&K engages scholars from across the arts, sciences, humanities, and technology in the examination of a manuscript produced at the very moment those fields began to diverge from one another.

Columbia University, New York, NY—For the Making and Knowing Project at the Center for Science and Society. A three-year grant of $200,000.

Council of Independent Colleges, Washington, DC—For the Presidents Governance Academy. A three-year grant of $200,000.


Henry R. Luce Initiative on Religion in International Affairs

The goal of the Henry R. Luce Initiative on Religion in International Affairs is to enhance public understanding of religion in global affairs by supporting interdisciplinary scholarship and collaboration across academic, media and policy communities. A grant to the British Council will expand opportunities for scholars and policymakers to share work, ideas and best practices at the intersection of religion and international affairs. A grant to Clare College will provide support for strengthening an international policy network on religion and diplomacy. Two grants support work on the Middle East: The Century Foundation will launch a research project on religious minorities and citizenship, while a grant to the Hollings Center will support a “dialogue conference” on the next generation and the future of pluralism in the region. A grant to the University of California, Davis will train emerging journalism students to produce thoughtful reporting about Muslim women, while a grant to Southern California Public Radio will support reporting on religion and diasporic communities, in collaboration with the University of Southern California. Finally, America Abroad Media will produce public radio programs and multimedia content on Islam and science; Islam in contemporary Europe; and Islamic media in the Middle East.

America Abroad Media, Washington, DC—For a series of public radio documentaries with a focus on Islam. A two-year grant of $350,000.

The Century Foundation, New York, NY—For the project, Religious Minorities and Citizenship in the Middle East. A two-year grant of $300,000.

Clare College, Cambridge Institute on Religion & International Studies, Cambridge, UK—For the Transatlantic Policy Network on Religion and Diplomacy. A three-year grant of $330,000.

Friends of the British Council, Washington, DC—For Bridging Voices: Next Generation, a program to strengthen transatlantic collaborations on religion and the public sphere. A three-year grant of $500,000.

Hollings Center for International Dialogue, Washington, DC—For the project, Next Generation Dialogue on The Future of Political Pluralism in the Middle East. A one-year grant of $70,000.

Southern California Public Radio, Pasadena, CA—For reporting on religion and diaspora communities in southern California. A two-year grant of $400,000.

University of California, Davis, Davis, CA—For the project, Representing Muslim Women: Muslim Women and the Media. A three-year grant of $340,000.


Theology

Three grants awarded by the Theology Program will support the program’s efforts to reimagine theology’s public and intellectual significance while cultivating the next generation of leaders. A grant to Boston University will enable the institution, in partnership with Hebrew College, to continue the publication of an academic journal and support a related online forum, both of which aim to enhance interreligious communication in scholarly and public settings. Human Media will use a grant to launch a new podcast series dedicated to the work and lives of chaplains, including the challenges they face in caring for increasingly diverse communities. A third grant will support the multimedia production On Being and its project Public Theology Reimagined.

Boston University, Boston, MA—To support the Journal of Interreligious Studies and a related online forum, in collaboration with Hebrew College. A two-year grant of $200,000.

Human Media, Boston, MA—To support The Chaplains Podcast. A two-year grant of $250,000.

On Being, Minneapolis, MN—Renewed support for Public Theology Reimagined. A two-year grant of $600,000.


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March 2017 Grants

The Henry Luce Foundation is pleased to announce over $9,500,000 in grants to 22 institutions. These grants, awarded in five program areas and for one special project, advance the Foundation’s commitment to fostering innovation and supporting informed public intellectual leadership.

Grants from the American Art Program will support two ground-breaking exhibitions of the work of contemporary artists, including Mark Bradford’s at the American Pavilion at the 2017 Venice Biennale. Two other grants will focus on African-American art and artists; one grant will help to create a digital archive of Alfred Stieglitz’s work; and the last will support the reinstallation of the Newark Museum’s permanent collection of American art.

The Asia program awarded seven grants. These will support policy-relevant research and dialogue focused on Southeast Asia and China, facilitate scholarly exchange between the U.S. and Indonesia, and fund a comprehensive history of Christianity in China. The Luce Initiative on Asian Studies and the Environment (LIASE), a grantmaking initiative of the Asia program, awarded its final three implementation grants to liberal arts colleges expanding interdisciplinary teaching and research on Asia and the environment.

Two grants from the Theology program will support projects at Catholic universities, one focused on community-engaged scholarship and the other on political theology. Meanwhile, two grants from the Henry R. Luce Initiative on Religion in International Affairs will support public media projects on religion in global affairs; three other grants will underwrite research on religious authority and U.S. foreign policy, Salafism in North Africa, and state management of religion in Africa.

Through its Higher Education program, the Foundation will continue to support a summer program for women graduate students in STEM fields at Ewha Womans University.

Finally, a grant to the Rockefeller Archive Center will fund the storage and maintenance of the Luce Foundation's grant archives and will establish an endowment to enable care for the collection in perpetuity.

Each of the grants awarded by the Foundation’s programs are described in more detail below:


American Art

Six grants will further the American Art Program's goals of supporting the study, experience, and understanding of art of the United States including two momentous shows in the field of contemporary art. The Baltimore Museum of Art and the Rose Art Museum will produce an exhibition of work by abstract artist and social activist Mark Bradford for the U.S. Pavilion of the 2017 Venice Biennale, and the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art will present the largest single, long-term retrospective installation of works by light and space artist James Turrell.

Three grants will support ongoing efforts to strengthen and activate permanent collections of American art. A major grant to the Newark Museum will support reinstallations of the modern and contemporary American Art galleries and two accompanying publications. A grant to The National Gallery of Art will underwrite a digital version of the seminal two-volume catalogue of the Gallery’s key set of photographs by Alfred Stieglitz with updated research and enhanced search and display capabilities. The American Art Program is also supporting the Art and Civil Rights Initiative, a unique collaboration between the Mississippi Museum of Art and Tougaloo College. The multi-year project will include exhibitions from their respective collections, museum training internships, and public engagement.

With the aim of promoting research throughout the American Art field, a major grant to the Smithsonian Institution’s Archives of American Art will support a targeted initiative to collect and preserve the papers of African American artists.

Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Art, Washington, DC—For the African American Collecting Initiative. A three-year grant of $575,000.

Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, MD—For a Mark Bradford exhibition in the U.S. Pavilion at the 2017 Venice Biennale and the Baltimore Museum of Art, and the accompanying catalogue. A one-year grant of $300,000.

Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, North Adams, MA—For a long-term retrospective installation of works by James Turrell. A one-year grant of $500,000.

Mississippi Museum of Art, Jackson, MS—For the Art and Civil Rights Initiative, a partnership with Tougaloo College. A two-year grant of $395,000.

National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC—For an expanded and accessible, online version of the publication, Alfred Stieglitz: The Key Set. A two-year grant of $255,000.

Newark Museum, Newark, NJ—For the reinstallation of permanent galleries of modern and contemporary American art, and two accompanying publications. A two-year grant of $750,000.


Asia

The Asia Program announces seven new grants to further its goals of improving U.S. understanding of Asia and fostering intellectual exchange between the United States and the countries of East and Southeast Asia. Four grants will help policymakers engage in informed dialogues as they work to maintain peace and stability in the Asia-Pacific. These include a grant to Inter-American Dialogue in support of a collaboration with the Initiative for Policy Dialogue at Columbia University to examine trends in China-Latin American relations; a grant to Seton Hall University to explore new approaches to crisis management and conflict resolution in the South China Sea; a grant to The Brookings Institution for research and associated programming on regional issues in Southeast Asia; and a grant to the Stimson Center to encourage ethnic reconciliation efforts in northern Myanmar.

Three grants will further the creation and dissemination of knowledge about Asia and scholarly exchange. A grant to the American Institute for Indonesian Studies will support research and training opportunities for Indonesian and American scholars as well as seminars to foster collaborations and new networks. A grant to the University of California, San Diego's 21st Century China Center will enable social scientific inquiry into Chinese politics, economy, and society through data-driven analysis of electronic media. And a grant to the Church Divinity School of the Pacific will fund collaboration between Chinese and Western scholars and publication of a new work addressing the history of Christianity in China.

University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA—For China Data Lab: Understanding China’s Changing Politics, Society and Economy in the Information Age, a project of the 21st Century China Center in partnership with San Diego State University. A three-year grant of $500,000.

Inter-American Dialogue, Washington, DC—For a China-Latin America project in collaboration with the Initiative for Policy Dialogue at Columbia University. A three-year grant of $300,000.

Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ—For a project to promote U.S.-China dialogue and dispute resolution on the South China Sea. A two-year grant of $200,000.

The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC—For research and programming on Southeast Asia. A three-year grant of $300,000.

The Henry L. Stimson Center, Washington, DC—For a dialogue program on ethnic reconciliation in northern Myanmar and the peace process. A one-year grant of $100,000.

American Institute for Indonesian Studies, Ithaca, NY—For fellowships and programming to foster scholarly exchange between Americans and Indonesians. A three-year grant of $345,000.

Church Divinity School of the Pacific, Berkeley, CA—For the book project History of Christianity in China: A Sino-Western/Intercultural Approach. A two-year grant of $70,000.


Luce Initiative on Asian Studies and the Environment (LIASE)

Established in 2010, the Luce Initiative on Asian Studies and the Environment (LIASE) has sought to encourage innovative, interdisciplinary approaches to Asian studies education and research through the lens of the environment and sustainable development. Three four-year grants have been awarded to liberal arts colleges to continue projects piloted through small exploratory grants. These awards mark the last round of grant giving, but LIASE will live on as grantees implement their projects.

Students and faculty across the Claremont Colleges, led by Claremont McKenna College, will examine the influence of infrastructure on the environment, social structures, and people's lived experiences through EnviroLab Asia, a semester-long course and corresponding clinic trip to Asia, where they will work with Yale-NUS College in Singapore. Vassar College will apply a grant toward multidisciplinary student and faculty workshops on land use and ecology in China, in collaboration with East China Normal University and Central China Normal University. At Washington & Jefferson College, faculty and students will engage in a series of joint projects with colleagues at Chinese institutions that will focus on understanding how the impacts of industrialization can be mitigated in both the United States and China.

Claremont McKenna College, Claremont, CA, (on behalf of the Claremont Colleges)—A four-year grant of $1,400,000.

Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY, —A four-year grant of $400,000.

Washington & Jefferson College, Washington, PA, —A four-year grant of $400,000.


Higher Education

A Higher Education grant will enable the Ewha Womans University in South Korea to extend the institution's Expanding Horizons program, an international seminar for U.S. and East Asian graduate students in STEM disciplines. New participants come together each summer to explore topics of gender, science, and leadership while networking and developing leadership skills.

Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea—A supplemental grant for Expanding Horizons: The Luce International Seminar for Women Graduate Students in STEM from the U.S. and East Asia. A one-year grant of $175,000.


Henry R. Luce Initiative on Religion in International Affairs

The Henry R. Luce Initiative on Religion in International Affairs aims to enhance public understanding of religion in politics by encouraging interdisciplinary research and collaboration between scholars, media, and policy communities. A grant to WGBH will support a public television production that will illuminate the interplay of religion and politics in the Sunni-Shi'a conflict. A grant to the GroundTruth Project will provide emerging journalists with training and collaboration opportunities as they report on the complex role of religion in several countries. Three additional grants will support research on the mechanisms of influence and legitimation of religious authority in the Middle East, the shifting Salafist landscape in the Maghreb, and efforts by African governments to manage religious influence and discourse.

WGBH Educational Foundation, Boston, MA—To produce a FRONTLINE program on the politics and theology of the Sunni-Shi’a divide. A one-year grant of $300,000.

The GroundTruth Project, Boston, MA—For training of journalists and collaborative reporting on religion in international affairs. A three-year grant of $350,000.

Rice University, James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy, Houston, TX—For a project on religious authority and U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East. A two-year grant of $400,000.

Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Washington, DC—For the project, The Dynamics of Salafism in the Maghreb. A two-year grant of $280,000.

Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington, DC—For a project on state strategies for managing religious relations in Africa. A two-year grant of $390,000.


Theology

Two grants will further the Theology Program's commitment to reexamining the place of theological inquiry in universities, supporting multidisciplinary scholarship, and promoting public engagement. A grant to Duquesne University will support cross-institutional learning and diverse community participation as campus scholars and administrators examine the relationship between religious inquiry and the university's mission. Villanova University will use a two-year grant to link scholars engaged in interdisciplinary discussions about religion and politics, through workshops and an online platform.

Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA—To support an interdisciplinary project on community-engaged scholarship and the common good. A three-year grant of $400,000.

Villanova University, Villanova, PA—To support an interdisciplinary network of scholars exploring the intersection of religious and political ideas. A two-year grant of $200,000.


Special Project

A grant to the Rockefeller Archive Center will support the cataloguing and long-term management of the Foundation's grant archives. The Luce Foundation's files will be housed alongside those of many other philanthropic organizations that have donated their archives to Rockefeller and will be accessible to researchers.

Rockefeller Archive Center, Sleepy Hollow, NY—To support the processing and maintenance of the Henry Luce Foundation archives. A two-year grant of $300,000.


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November 2016 Grants

The Henry Luce Foundation is pleased to announce over $13,000,000 in grants to 42 institutions. These grants, awarded in five program areas, advance the Foundation’s commitments to the development of intellectual leaders and the public dissemination of knowledge.

Fourteen grants from the Luce Fund in American Art will support exhibitions across the country that celebrate and probe the depth and variety of American art from every era of the country’s history. Five responsive grants from the American Art program will fund work on pre-contemporary collections, as well as entry-level positions designed to open the field to new and more diverse perspectives.

Seven grants from the Asia program will support art exhibitions that will bring both ancient and contemporary Asian art to the United States, collaborations related to the study of Chinese folk culture, and communication between scholars in North America and North Korea. Meanwhile, two grants from the Henry R. Luce Initiative on Religion in International Affairs focus on fostering richly informed coverage of international religion in the media.

Three grants from the Higher Education program will support new approaches to doctoral education and higher education policymaking, as well as a study addressing sexual harassment in STEM fields. Five Theology program grants will support projects that blend theological and multidisciplinary perspectives and prepare spiritual leaders to minister to a changing world. And, in its inaugural year, grants from the Luce Fund for Theological Education will support six seminaries and divinity schools as they explore ways to train their students to serve diverse populations and to engage with the broader public.

The grants of each of the Foundation’s programs are described in more detail below:

American Art

Each November, the American Art Program announces the recipients of funding for the major loan exhibitions and related publications that are anticipated to make significant contributions to the public and scholarly experience and understanding of American art. This year’s slate of 14 exhibitions, awarded to museums in nine states and the United Kingdom, represents a wide range of artists, practices, and curatorial approaches.

Among the eight monographic projects are exhibitions dedicated to iconic figures including Marsden Hartley’s Maine at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Grant Wood at the Whitney Museum; as well as such forthcoming landmark retrospectives as Charles White at The Art Institute of Chicago, and Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World at the Hammer Museum. This year, six thematic exhibitions range from the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s expansive survey of American watercolor practice, to the Portland Museum of Art’s consideration of four modern American figurative sculptors, and an exhibition of art associated with the 20th-century Black Power Movement at London’s Tate.

Photography is featured in-depth in three exhibitions, at the Princeton University Art Museum, the Georgia Museum of Art, and The Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Pennsylvania, exploring respectively Clarence White and Doris Ulmann, and photographs of the steel industry. Several smaller-scale exhibitions that tap unique and compelling institutional perspectives include the Harvard Art Museum’s The Philosophy Chamber: Harvard’s Lost Collection, 1766-1820, The Morgan Library and Museum’s Henry James and American Art, and The Bronx Museum of the Arts’ Anarchitecture: Gordon Matta-Clark and the Bronx.

Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL—For the exhibition and catalogue, Charles White. A grant of $225,000.

The Bronx Museum of the Arts, Bronx, NY—For the exhibition and catalogue, Anarchitecture: Gordon Matta-Clark and the Bronx. A grant of $175,000.

Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, Athens, GA—For the exhibition and catalogue, Vernacular Modernism: The Photography of Doris Ulmann. A grant of $75,000.

Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, CA—For the exhibition and catalogue, Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World. A grant of $200,000.

Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge, MA—For the exhibition and catalogue, The Philosophy Chamber: Harvard’s Lost Collection, 1766-1820. A grant of $100,000.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY—For the exhibition and catalogue, Marsden Hartley’s Maine. A grant of $200,000.

The Morgan Library & Art Museum, New York, NY—For the exhibition and catalogue, Henry James and American Art. A grant of $135,000.

Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA—For the exhibition and catalogue, American Watercolor in the Age of Homer and Sargent. A grant of $250,000.

Portland Museum of Art, Portland, ME—For the exhibition and catalogue, New American Sculpture: Gaston Lachaise, Robert Laurent, Elie Nadelman, and William Zorach. A grant of $200,000.

Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton, NJ—For the exhibition and catalogue, Clarence White and His World: The Art and Craft of Photography, 1895 – 1925. A grant of $150,000.

Tate Modern, London, UK—For the exhibition and catalogue, Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power. A grant of $100,000.

Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN—For the exhibition and catalogue, Allen Ruppersberg: Intellectual Property, 1968-2018. A grant of $200,000.

The Westmoreland Museum of Art, Greensburg, PA—For the exhibition and catalogue, Molten Light: Photography, Steel and the Modern World. A grant of $150,000.

Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY—For the exhibition and catalogue, Grant Wood. A grant of $200,000.

In addition to this year’s round of special-exhibition funding, two of five responsive grants are designed to specifically support pressing needs in the areas of permanent-collection exhibitions and curatorial training. Three-year grants to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston and the Worcester Art Museum will test a new project type that links a sequence of three, one-year installations of under-exhibited areas of pre-contemporary collections and with curatorial apprenticeships. A grant to the The Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery will support the Whistler Watercolor Initiative, a similarly multi-tiered project that includes research and technical studies, an exhibition, and a curatorial apprenticeship.

A grant to Historic Artists’ Homes and Studios will help to improve the scope and effectiveness of the organization’s network, advocacy, and outreach, while a first-time grant to Storm King Art Center will support the organization’s comprehensive archives and oral history project. The American Art program has invited several of these grantees to accept funding for paid summer internships for college students from communities under-represented on museum staffs today, bringing to fourteen the number of such internships funded through the program’s responsive grants this year.

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC—To support the Whistler Watercolor Initiative, and reinstallation of The Peacock Room. A three-year grant of $435,000.

Historic Artists’ Homes and Studios, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Stockbridge, MA—To support a Historic Artists’ Homes and Studios program administrator to implement a new strategic plan. A three-year grant of $375,000.

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Boston, MA—For a pilot program supporting collection-based exhibitions of pre-contemporary art and curatorial apprenticeships. A three-year grant of $825,000.

Storm King Art Center, New Windsor, NY—To support the oral history and archives program. A two-year grant of $460,000.

Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, MA—For a pilot program supporting collection-based exhibitions of pre-contemporary art and curatorial apprenticeships. A three-year grant of $825,000.

Asia

The Asia Program is dedicated to fostering cultural and intellectual exchanges between the United States and the countries of East and Southeast Asia and to creating scholarly and public resources for improved understanding of Asia in the United States. Three new grants support the study and exhibition of Asian art, including an exhibition of early Chinese imperial art at the Metropolitan Museum, an exhibition of near-contemporary Chinese work at the Guggenheim Museum, and a publication series on Asian art produced by the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art at the University of Florida.

Other grant-supported efforts include summer institutes and museum exchanges organized by the American Folklore Society in partnership with the China Folklore Society, and a research initiative on Southeast Asian cities directed by the International Institute for Asian Studies at the Universiteit Leiden. Awards are also enhancing opportunities for sharing knowledge on and with the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea—through the University of British Columbia’s Canada-DPRK Knowledge Partnership Program and programming of the National Committee on North Korea at Mercy Corps.

American Folklore Society, Bloomington, IN—For collaborations in China with the China Folklore Society and other Chinese institutions. A three-year grant of $408,000.

Mercy Corps, Washington, DC—For programming of the National Committee on North Korea. A one-year grant of $60,000.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY—For the exhibition and catalogue Age of Empires: Chinese Art of the Qin and Han Dynasties (221 B.C.- A.D. 220). A one-year grant of $300,000.

Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL—For a series of publications on Asian art. A four-year grant of $282,000.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, New York, NY—For the exhibition and catalogue Art and China After 1989: Theater of the World. A one-year grant of $200,000.

Universiteit Leiden, Leiden, the Netherlands—For the Southeast Asia Neighborhoods Network project of the International Institute for Asian Studies. A four-year grant of $360,000.

University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada—For the Canada-DPRK Knowledge Partnership Program. A one-year grant of $145,000.

Henry R. Luce Initiative on Religion in International Affairs

Two grants from the Henry R. Luce Initiative on Religion in International Affairs expand and deepen the Initiative’s support for media-related work. Renewed support to the American Council of Learned Societies will encourage academic institutions to explore ways to bridge the gap between religion scholarship and journalism. New America’s International Reporting Project will address the declining investment by news outlets in international reporting by supporting eight fellows a year to carry out overseas religion reporting projects.

American Council of Learned Societies, New York, NY—Renewed support for a program on religion, journalism, and international affairs. A two-year grant of $790,000.

New America, Washington, DC—For the International Reporting Project’s fellowships on religion in international affairs. A three-year grant of $300,000.

Higher Education

Three new grants from the Higher Education Program reflect the program’s new priorities, announced earlier this year. A grant to the National Academy of Sciences will fund a study of sexual harassment in science, engineering, and medicine, advancing the goals of the Clare Boothe Luce program by supporting the cause of gender diversity in the sciences. A grant to the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation seeks to equip higher education and government leaders to work more effectively together on behalf of colleges and universities. Finally, in accordance with the program’s goal of supporting innovation in doctoral education, a grant to the University of Delaware will support a new interdisciplinary PhD program in African American Public Humanities that will prepare students for careers as public scholars through a combination of traditional instruction and training in practical skills.

National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC—To support a study of the prevalence and impact of sexual harassment in the scientific, engineering, and medical workforce. A two-year grant of $250,000.

The University of Delaware, Newark, DE—To support a new public humanities approach to doctoral education. A three-year grant of $300,000.

Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, Princeton, NJ—To support a new initiative to improve communication and collaboration between state policymakers and higher education leaders. A two-year grant of $350,000.

Theology

Three grants from the Theology program fund innovative projects at research universities. A four-year grant to the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University will support a multidisciplinary exploration of humanity’s place in an Anthropocene world, reflecting the program’s emphasis on fostering work that incorporates both theological and non-theological perspectives. A major three-year grant to Vanderbilt Divinity School will enable the school to foster national dialogue on public theology and racial justice, and to prepare a new generation of leaders to think theologically about racial diversity. And a grant to the University of Southern California will support a project on digital journalism, media strategies and public theology.

Two additional grants fund the exploration of challenges and opportunities in theological education. A grant to Lancaster Theological Seminary will support a series of workshops to study current and future directions in the field of the theological education, while a grant to the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education will support an assessment of the current state of healthcare chaplaincy education, with particular attention to the challenges of training chaplains to care for people of many different faiths.

Association for Clinical Pastoral Education, Decatur, GA—To support the assessment of healthcare chaplaincy education. A three-year grant of $275,000.

Duke University, Durham, NC—To support “Rethinking Humanity’s Place in an Anthropocene World,” a project at the Kenan Institute for Ethics. A four-year grant of $550,000.

Lancaster Theological Seminary, Lancaster, PA—To support a project on current and future directions in theological education. A three-year grant of $275,000.

University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA—To support a project on public theology and journalism. A two-year grant of $300,000.

Vanderbilt Divinity School, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN—To support a project on public theology and racial justice. A three-year grant of $1,000,000.

The Luce Fund for Theological Education

The Theology program is also proud to announce six inaugural grants from the Luce Fund for Theological Education, which supports the development of new models of teaching, learning, research, publication, and leadership development. Grants approved in the Luce Fund’s first round of competition aim to adapt theological education to an era of increased appreciation for religious and other forms of diversity, and to encourage seminaries and their students to engage with a range of broader social challenges.

Supported projects include the launch of an Interreligious Institute at Chicago Theological Seminary, the development of a global network of Christian-Muslim Studies at the University of Edinburgh’s School of Divinity, and an effort by Reconstructionist Rabbinical College to support and connect campus chaplains. Western Theological Seminary will seek to train ministry students to be attuned to and inclusive of people with disabilities and the American Baptist Seminary of the West will create a Public Theology Certificate, while a grant to the Methodist Theological School in Ohio will fund an initiative to advance environmental engagement at a dozen different seminaries.

The Foundation will begin accepting new letters of inquiry to the Luce Fund for Theological Education in early 2017. Inquiries may be submitted any time after January 1st, and must be received no later than March 15th.

American Baptist Seminary of the West, Berkeley, CA—To establish a Public Theology Certificate, in collaboration with the PICO National Network. A grant of $425,000.

Chicago Theological Seminary, Chicago, IL—To launch an Interreligious Institute. A grant of $425,000.

Methodist Theological School in Ohio, Delaware, OH—To establish an initiative to advance seminary environmental engagement, in collaboration with the Interfaith Center for Sustainable Development and the Green Seminary Initiative. A grant of $425,000.

Reconstructionist Rabbinical College, Wyncote, PA—For a project on campus chaplaincy and religious diversity. A grant of $425,000.

University of Edinburgh School of Divinity, Edinburgh, Scotland—To launch a Global Network of Christian-Muslim Studies. A grant of $425,000.

Western Theological Seminary, Holland, MI—To develop a program on disability and ministry. A grant of $425,000.

Clare Boothe Luce Program 2016 Grants

The Clare Boothe Luce program is pleased to announce 23 grants totaling $7,000,000 to support women in STEM fields. Established by Clare Boothe Luce in 1987, the Program offers research awards and tuition support to prepare young women to study and teach in the STEM disciplines, as well as five-year professorships for women early in their academic careers. Grants to Johns Hopkins University, Smith College, and the University of Detroit Mercy will fund a total of four five-year assistant professorships for women in STEM fields; grants to Providence College and Xavier University will provide undergraduate scholarships to a total of eleven young women, while grants to Dartmouth College, Kenyon College, Macalester College, Texas A&M University and the University of Dayton will fund undergraduate research awards. These grants will support the work of 89 women in total. In addition to these ten new awards, the Program awarded grants to the 13 institutions designated in Clare Boothe Luce's bequest to receive funds in perpetuity. We are pleased to continue our partnership with these institutions.

Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH— To support twelve undergraduate research awards. A grant of $252,000.

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD—To support two professorships. A grant of $500,000.

Kenyon College, Gambier, OH— To support twenty-two undergraduate research awards. A grant of $176,000.

Macalester College, St Paul, MN— To support twenty-four undergraduate research awards. A grant of $228,792.

Providence College, Providence, RI—To support eight undergraduate scholarships. A grant of $288,538.

Smith College, Northampton, MA—To support one professorship. A grant of $499,975.

Texas A&M University, College Station, TX—To support eight undergraduate research awards. A grant of $250,000.

University of Dayton, Dayton, OH—To support eight undergraduate research awards. A grant of $201,600.

University of Detroit Mercy, Detroit, MI— To support one professorship. A grant of $476,750.

Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH—To support three undergraduate scholarships. A grant of $225,000.

June 2016 Grants

The Henry Luce Foundation is pleased to announce over $7,000,000 in grants to 17 institutions. These grants reflect the Foundation’s commitment to fostering 21st century leaders and to bringing high quality scholarship into public discourse.

Four grants from the American Art Program will support expansion and digitization projects, broadening public access to collections that are of critical importance to the history of American Art. Grants from the Asia Program will support postdoctoral teaching fellowships and offer opportunities for academic exchanges and policy dialogues between East Asia and the U.S. Five grants from the Henry R. Luce Initiative on Religion in International Affairs will fund expanded media coverage of religion’s role in public life and research focused on the Middle East and Central America. A grant from the Higher Education Program furnishes renewed support to leadership training sessions organized by the Society of Women Engineers, while four grants from the Theology Program will support innovative approaches to the study of religion and to religious leadership development. In total, these seventeen grants advance the Foundation’s efforts to deepen scholarly and public understanding from a variety of disciplinary, geographic and religious perspectives.

The grants of each of the Foundation’s programs are described in more detail below:

American Art

Along with supporting a slate of ten or more loan exhibitions each year, the Foundation’s American Art program is committed to making museums’ permanent collections of American art more accessible to local and global audiences. This year, a grant to the Asheville Art Museum will support a vastly expanded installation of the museum’s holdings, including Eastern Cherokee arts, North Carolina studio crafts, and art from Black Mountain College. A grant to Chesterwood, the historic home and studio of the sculptor Daniel Chester French, will underwrite a new permanent collection exhibition of 200 models, maquettes and finished sculptures. Support to the Rochester Institute of Technology’s Graphic Design Archive will fund the digitization of the collection and a fully accessible website, which will feature process work, drawings and models by forty-four leading 20th century American modernist graphic designers. Meanwhile, a grant to the Shaker Museum | Mount Lebanon will support a comprehensive collection survey and creation of a publicly-accessible electronic catalogue of 17,000 examples of Shaker arts and design.

Asheville Art Museum, Asheville, NC—To reinstall the permanent collection and produce an accompanying publication. A two-year grant of $375,000.

Chesterwood – National Trust for Historic Preservation, Stockbridge, MA—To install a new permanent collection gallery and assess the drawing and print collection. A one-year grant of $300,000.

Rochester Institute of Technology, Graphic Design Archive, Rochester, NY—To document, digitize, and preserve the collection. A three-year grant of $280,000.

Shaker Museum | Mount Lebanon, New Lebanon, NY—To create a publicly accessible electronic catalogue of the permanent collection. A two-year grant of $750,000.

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Asia

The Luce Foundation's Asia Program is dedicated to encouraging intellectual exchange between the United States and Asia and improved American understanding of Asia. A renewal of support to ASIANetwork will fund six postdoctoral teaching fellowships that will bring cutting edge scholarship in Asian studies to liberal arts colleges and provide teaching experience in the liberal arts context to new PhDs. A grant to the University of San Francisco will allow the Ricci Institute of Chinese-Western Cultural History to bring together scholars from China, Japan, Korea and the West for a research and publication program on the historical legacies of Christianity in East Asia. Finally, a grant to the National Committee on American Foreign Policy will continue support for the Forum on Asia-Pacific Security, a series of bilateral and multilateral policy dialogues.

ASIANetwork, Richmond, IN—For continuation of a postdoctoral teaching fellowship program. A three-year grant of $500,000.

National Committee on American Foreign Policy, New York, NY —For ongoing policy dialogues of the Forum on Asia-Pacific Security. A three-year grant of $525,000.

University of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA—– For the Historical Legacies of Christianity in East Asia project of the Ricci Institute for Chinese-Western Cultural History. A four-year grant of $538,000.

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Henry R. Luce Initiative on Religion in International Affairs

The Henry R. Luce Initiative on Religion in International Affairs supports projects that enrich and deepen the public study and discussion of religion’s role in international affairs. A grant to the Atlantic Monthly Group will support increased coverage of religion on Atlantic.com, particularly on under-reported areas like Africa and Latin America, through both feature stories and notes. Renewed support to the Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting will fund reporting and collaborations with university partners on such issues as religion and the environment, reproductive rights, and debates on free speech, and religion in cyberspace. Renewed support to the Social Science Research Council will promote interdisciplinary commentary and debate about secularism, religion and the public sphere on The Immanent Frame. A grant to the RAND Corporation will support research on resilience and resistance to sectarianism in the Middle East, with a focus on Lebanon, Bahrain and Oman. New York University’s Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics received a grant for an exploration of religious actors’ responses to the humanitarian crisis of migration from Central America through Mexico to the United States.

The Atlantic Monthly Group, Inc., Washington, DC—For expanded coverage of religion on TheAtlantic.com. A two-year grant of $490,000.

Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, Washington, DC—Renewed support for reporting and university collaborations on religion in global affairs. A three-year grant of $450,000.

RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, CA—Support for Building Resilience and Countering Sectarianism in the Middle East. A two-year grant of $380,000.

New York University, New York, NY—For a project on migrants, religious leaders and civil society in the Americas. A three-year grant of $700,000.

Social Science Research Council, New York, NY—Continued support for The Immanent Frame. A two-year grant of $320,000.

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Higher Education

The Higher Education Program has renewed its support to the Society of Women Engineers for the Academic Leadership for Women in Engineering (ALWE) program, a training workshop that centers on issues of academic leadership development and management skills that are not typically components of an engineering advanced degree, including strategic finance, negotiation, and departmental strategy.

Society of Women Engineers (SWE), Chicago, IL —Continued support for a program that introduces women engineers to academic administration as a career path. A three-year grant of $150,000.

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Theology

Four grants from the Foundation’s Theology program will support innovative approaches to the study of religion and programs that prepare scholars and faith leaders for engagement with a multifaith world. Following a successful earlier grant, the Council of Independent Colleges has received a grant to support summer seminars for college and university faculty on “Teaching Interfaith Understanding.” Renewed support to Auburn Theological Seminary will continue the Auburn Senior Fellows Program, a new model of leadership development that trains faith leaders to build community and collaboration in a globalized, multifaith world. Ohio State University will use a Theology Program grant to undertake a project exploring the sounds of religion in the United States, including the construction of a sonic archive, field recordings, and oral histories, while a grant to CU Boulder will support an investigation of the changing nature of religious scholarship in the digital age, exploring models for publicly-engaged writing on religion.

Auburn Theological Seminary, New York, NY—Renewed support for the Auburn Senior Fellows Program. A three-year grant of $600,000.

The Council of Independent Colleges, Washington, DC—Renewed support for faculty seminars on teaching interfaith understanding, in collaboration with the Interfaith Youth Core. A three-year grant of $400,000.

The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH—To support the American Religious Sounds Project at the Center for the Study of Religion. A two-year grant of $200,000.

University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO—To support Public Religion and Public Scholarship in the Digital Age, a project at the Center for Media, Religion and Culture. A three-year grant of $500,000.

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March 2016 Grants

The Henry Luce Foundation is pleased to announce over $6,000,000 in grants to 19 institutions. These grants reflect the Foundation’s commitment to supporting innovative, globally-minded research that can enrich both scholarly and public discourse.

Five grants from the Henry R. Luce Initiative on Religion in International Affairs will enable scholars and journalists to develop and disseminate a more nuanced understanding of religion’s role in global affairs. Seven grants from the Asia Program will support the production and sharing of new knowledge on East and Southeast Asia; meanwhile, four grants from the Asia Program’s Luce Initiative on Asian Studies and the Environment continue that program’s support for innovative teaching on Asia and the environment at the undergraduate level.

Additional grants from the American Art Program, Public Policy Program, and Theology Program will promote work that seeks to shift traditional perspectives and encourages the exchange of ideas. The Foundation has also recently announced the 2016-2017 class of Luce Scholars – 18 exceptional young men and women who will spend a year living and working in Asia.

The grants of each of the Foundation’s programs are described in more detail below:

Religion in International Affairs

Established in 2005, the Henry R. Luce Initiative on Religion in International Affairs (HRLI) seeks to develop deeper understanding of religion in international affairs and to enhance public discussion of the topic. Grants made this spring to the Center for Strategic and International Studies, George Washington University, and Columbia University will bring together diverse thinkers – scholars, activists, and journalists with both global and local perspectives – to explore the role of religion in Russia, in civil society in Central Eurasia, and in the global discourse about violence against women. A renewal of support to Interfaith Voices will support public radio programming, and a new grant to the Magnum Foundation will allow photographers to work with scholars and media producers on new ways of representing and interpreting issues related to religion in the world.

Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington, DC—For a project on religion and violence in Russia. A two-year grant of $380,000.

Columbia University, New York, NY —For a project on religion and the global discourse about violence against women. A three-year grant of $445,000.

Faith Matters, Inc. , Washington, DC—Continued support for Interfaith Voices’ public radio series, “God and Government.” A two-year grant of $200,000.

The George Washington University, Elliott School of International Affairs, Washington, DC—Continued support for an initiative on religion and international affairs in Central Eurasia, with a focus on Islamic civil society. A two-year grant of $295,000.

Magnum Foundation, New York, NY—For an initiative to produce and disseminate visual documentary projects on religion in international affairs. A one-year grant of $150,000.

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Asia

Seven grants from the Asia Program reflect the program’s commitment to developing and expanding teaching and research within the field of Asian studies. Grants to the Council on Foreign Relations, Rice University, and the University of Hawai’i advance the program’s longstanding interest in promoting work on Southeast Asia, while a grant to Colby College for an exhibition of the work of Zao Wou-ki is in keeping with the program’s focus on making the work of Asian artists accessible in the West. Renewed support to the American Council of Learned Societies for its China Studies Program will give early-career scholars the opportunity to conduct field research, while a grant to National Taiwan University for the Asian Barometer Survey will make reliable public opinion data on Asia readily available to academics, journalists, and policy makers.

American Council of Learned Societies, New York, NY—Ongoing support for the China Studies Program. A two-year grant of $1,500,000.

Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs, New York, NY—For Building Pacific Communities, an experiential learning and cultural exchange program of the Global Ethics Network. A three-year grant of $310,000.

Colby College Museum of Art, Waterville, ME—For the exhibition and catalogue No Limits: The Art of Zao Wou-ki. A one-year grant of $150,000.

Council on Foreign Relations, New York, NY—For research and programming on Southeast Asia. A two-year grant of $180,000.

National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan—For the Asian Barometer Survey of popular attitudes toward democracy, governance and development in East and Southeast Asia. A five-year grant of $350,000.

Rice University, Houston, TX—For a postdoctoral fellowship on Southeast Asia, for the Transnational Asia Research Initiative at the Chao Center for Asian Studies. A two-year grant of $100,000.

University of Hawai’i Foundation, Honolulu, HI—For a program, in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin-Madison, to strengthen Southeast Asian studies through language training and research. A three-year grant of $230,000.

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LIASE

Established in 2010, the Luce Initiative on Asian Studies and the Environment (LIASE) encourages innovative approaches to Asian studies teaching and research at liberal arts colleges through the lens of the environment and sustainable development. Following a year of experimentation and program-building with the support of small exploratory grants, the following four schools have received four-year implementation grants to continue the LIASE program on their campuses. Beloit College faculty and students will explore the landscapes of China’s Yellow River region and of Northern Japan from cultural and scientific perspectives. Centre College will bring together students from Asian Studies, Philosophy, Environmental Studies and Conservation Biology for a lab and related activities on the impact of food processing industries in Thailand, Malaysia and China, and in Kentucky. Furman University’s initiative will feature Chinese language training, team-taught interdisciplinary coursework, and reciprocal exchanges with Yunnan Minzu University in Southwestern China. Oberlin College, using the theme of resilience as an organizing principle, will link on-campus experiences, including exhibitions at the Allen Memorial Art Museum, with faculty-led tours and opportunities for student research in Asia.

Beloit College, Beloit, WI—For "Landscapes in Transition: Environment, Culture, Society in China and Japan." A four-year grant of $400,000.

Centre College, Danville, KY—For "Teaching Asia and the Environment through Scaffolded, High-impact Practices." A four-year grant of $400,000.

Furman University, Greenville, SC—For "Chinese Environmental Studies Initiative: Exploring Provincial and Local-Level Pathways to Sustainability." A four-year grant of $400,000.

Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH—For "Sustainability and Resilience in the Face of Environmental Stress and Extreme Events." A four-year grant of $400,000.

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American Art

A grant from the American Art Program to the Anchorage Museum will support the Museum’s reinterpretation of its art collection as part of its Polar Lab initiative, tapping collections to expand understanding and dialogue around the past, present, and future of the Polar North.

Anchorage Museum, Anchorage, AK—To support project management, conservation, digitization, and a publication for new Art of the North Galleries. A one-year grant of $120,000.

Public Policy

A grant from the Public Policy program to the Library of Congress will support an orientation seminar for new Congress members from both political parties, including procedural training, policy issue briefings, and an introduction to available resources.

The Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service, Washington, DC—For an orientation seminar for new Members of the 115th Congress. A one-year grant of $80,000.

Theology

A grant from the Theology Program to Yale University will support a collaborative project on the objects, ritual practices, sensory experiences and visual cultures associated with the many religious traditions of the Americas, extending the Foundation’s longstanding interest in religion and the arts.

Yale University, New Haven, CT—To support an interdisciplinary project on material religion in the Americas. A five-year grant of $500,000.

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November 2015 Grants

The Henry Luce Foundation is pleased to announce over $22,000,000 in grants to 60 institutions. These grants reflect the Foundation’s longstanding commitment to fostering innovative scholarship, informed leadership, and cross-cultural understanding. Grants from the Higher Education program aim to develop a new, diverse generation of leaders. The Asia, Theology, and Religion in International Affairs programs are providing institutions the funding they need to pursue complex research and educational projects, often interdisciplinary and international in scope. Eleven grants from the Luce Fund in American Art will support thought-provoking and field-defining special exhibitions. And grants to 24 institutions from the Clare Boothe Luce program will help to encourage women in STEM fields by supporting student research and junior professorships.

In addition to these programmatic awards, the Foundation’s Board also approved a significant special grant to the New-York Historical Society to support the preservation of the Time, Inc. archive. Time, Inc. has donated the entirety of its archival collections to the New York Historical Society, an estimated 7 million documents that include administrative, editorial, and media material from Time Inc.’s major publications (Time, Fortune, Life, Sports Illustrated, and People), as well as the private correspondence of Time’s—and the Foundation’s—founder, Henry R. Luce. The grant will make it possible for the Society to process, move, and store the materials, preserving a major record of 20th century events for future scholars.

Taken together, these grants reflect the Foundation’s commitment to the future of American and international knowledge, and to the researchers, thinkers, and policy-makers who will safeguard it.

The grants of each of the Foundation’s programs are described in more detail below:

American Art

Every November, the Luce Fund in American Art offers early-stage support for about ten special exhibitions and related publications that will contribute significantly to the public and scholarly understanding of American art. Some of this year’s grants focus on broadening appreciation for historically marginalized artists, including a grant to the Columbia Museum of Art in South Carolina for REMIX: Themes & Variations in African-American Art and a grant to the Minneapolis Institute of Art for a century-spanning exhibition, the exhibition Native American Women Artists. Other grants offer new perspectives on rarely-seen historic art, including an exhibition on etchings by Boston’s Paul Revere organized by the American Antiquarian Society, and seminal first-time assessments, including an SF MoMA retrospective of the avant garde San Francisco artist Bruce Conner. A number of exhibitions feature fresh approaches, including the first exhibition pairing of the American Jasper Johns and the Norwegian Edvard Munch by the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts; and Princeton University Art Museum’s Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment. The American Art program has also renewed its commitment to the Luce/ACLS Dissertation Fellowships in American Art, supporting a new generation of scholars of American Art at a pivotal early stage in their career.

American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, MA—For the exhibition and catalogue, Paul Revere: Artisan and Entrepreneur. A grant of $125,000.

American Council of Learned Societies, New York, NY—Continued support of the Luce/ACLS American Art Dissertation Fellowship Program. A five-year grant of $2,373,750.

Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, SC—For the exhibition and catalogue, REMIX: Themes & Variations in African-American Art. A grant of $100,000.

Minneapolis Institute of Art, Minneapolis, MN—For the exhibition and catalogue, Native American Women Artists. A grant of $200,000.

Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY—For the exhibition and catalogue, Out of Clay: Peter Voulkos 1953-1968. A grant of $150,000.

National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC—For the exhibition and catalogue, In Full Swing: The Art of Stuart Davis. A grant of $300,000.

Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill, NY—For the exhibition and catalogue, John Graham: Maverick Modernist. A grant of $200,000.

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, PA—For the exhibition and catalogue, World War I and American Art. A grant of $250,000.

Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton, NJ—For the exhibition and catalogue, Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment. A grant of $125,000.

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, CA—For the exhibition and catalogue, Bruce Conner: It’s All True. A grant of $300,000.

Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, VA—For the exhibition and catalogue, Jasper Johns and Edvard Munch: Shadows and Reflections. A grant of $100,000.

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Asia

The Asia program has announced nine new grants to aid development of the field of Asian studies and encourage American engagement with Chinese history, arts and culture. Several grants will help nurture a new generation of Asia scholars. These include awards to the Association for Asian Studies for summer workshops on emerging fields in the study of Asia and to Duke University for the Southeast Asia Research Group. Grants to the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the National Committee on United States-China Relations will assist with the creation of new archival resources. Finally, the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco is receiving support for an exhibition of imperial art treasures from the National Palace Museum, Taipei.

Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, CA— For the exhibition and catalogue Emperors' Treasures: Chinese Art from the National Palace Museum, Taipei. A one-year grant of $250,000.

Association for Asian Studies, Ann Arbor, MI— For a summer workshop program on emerging fields in the study of Asia. A four-year grant of $300,000.

Duke University, Durham, NC— For activities of the Southeast Asia Research Group. A three-year grant of $300,000.

National Committee on United States-China Relations, New York, NY—For a project to archive the Committee’s records. A two-year grant of $155,000.

NUS America Foundation Inc., Sunnyvale, CA—For the Asian Graduate Student Fellowship Program and Graduate Forum on Southeast Asian Studies of the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore. A three-year grant of $270,000.

University of Washington, Seattle, WA— For a project of the Myanmar Librarian Training Consortium. A two-year grant of $112,000.

University of Wisconsin Foundation, Madison, WI—For scholarships to the Southeast Asian Studies Summer Institute. A four-year grant of $300,000.

Vermont Studio Center, Johnson, VT—Renewed support for a Chinese poetry and translation residency program. A three-year grant of $175,000.

Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Washington, DC—For a project to expand the Chinese foreign policy documents database of the Cold War International History Project. A two-year grant of $240,000.

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Clare Boothe Luce

In addition to its continued commitment to thirteen designated institutions, the Clare Boothe Luce Program has approved eleven new grants: seven for undergraduate scholarships or research awards, one for graduate fellowships, and three for professorships. These grants will support a total of 80 women working in STEM fields.

Barnard College, New York, NY— To support eight undergraduate research awards. A grant of $196,440.

College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA—To support six undergraduate scholarship. A grant of $218,722.

Columbia University, New York, NY— To support one professorship. A grant of $500,000.

Duke University, Durham, NC— To support two professorships. a grant of $500,000.

Lafayette College, Easton, PA—To support twenty-four undergraduate research awards. A grant of $150,000.

Harvey Mudd College, Claremont, CA—To support two undergraduate scholarships. A grant of $160,000.

Morgan State University, Worcester, MA—To support four undergraduate scholarship. A grant of $296,856.

Mount St. Mary's University, Emmitsburg, MD—To support six undergraduate scholarship. A grant of $174,996.

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI— To support one professorship. A grant of $500,000.

Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO—To support two graduate fellowships. A grant of $300,000.

Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA—To support twenty-four undergraduate research awards. A grant of $204,000.

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Religion in International Affairs

The Henry R. Luce Initiative on Religion in International Affairs has announced five new grants that will give institutions the resources they need to do innovative, interdisciplinary work in this field. All of the grants place a particular emphasis on cross-regional and cross-disciplinary perspectives. Grants to the American Council of Learned Societies and New York University have a particular focus on collaborations between scholarship and journalism.

American Council of Learned Societies, New York, NY —For a program on religion, journalism, and international affairs. A two-year grant of $771,000.

American University, Washington, DC—For a project on religion and climate change in cross-regional perspective. A two-year grant of $425,000.

International Crisis Group, Washington, DC—For a project on religion and conflict in Africa, Asia and the Middle East. A two-year grant of $400,000.

New York University, New York, NY—For a project, Religious Stakes in Digital Times: Scholars and Journalists in Conversation. A three-year grant of $300,000.

Northwestern University, Evanston, IL—For the collaborative research project, The Politics of Religion at Home and Abroad. A three-year grant of $390,000.

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Higher Education

Two major grants from the Higher Education program reflect the Luce Foundation’s interest in developing a new generation of diverse and prepared leaders. A grant to Higher Education Resource Services (HERS) will establish a project that trains women in STEM for higher education leadership roles – a natural complement to the historic interests of the Clare Boothe Luce Program. The Foundation has also renewed its support for the World Pathways Heritage Language Scholars program at LaGuardia Community College, offering language training and leadership workshops to heritage language speakers to help them unlock the leadership potential that their bicultural background affords them.

Higher Education Resource Services (HERS), Denver, CO—Support for a program that trains women in STEM for higher education leadership roles. A three-year grant of $450,000.

LaGuardia Community College, Queens, NY—To support the third cohort of World Pathways Heritage Language Scholars and to support faculty in the program in future years. A three-year grant of $350,000.

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Public Policy

The Public Policy program has renewed its support to the Aspen Institute’s Congressional Program, which offers Members of Congress the opportunity to explore critical policy topics with internationally recognized experts in a non-partisan context.

The Aspen Institute, Washington, DC—For a program to inform Members of Congress about international issues. A two-year grant of $250,000.

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Theology

The Theology program’s grants reflect a dual commitment to boundary crossing scholarship and theological education. A major grant to the University of Virginia will seek to connect the academic study of religion, theological inquiry and public discourse. Several grants will support work that crosses religious and national borders – including support for Central Baptist Theological Seminary’s partnership with the Myanmar Institute of Theology, and a grant to Hartford Seminary to support a new faculty member with expertise in Christian-Muslim relations. A grant to St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Seminary will launch a new project on spirituality and the sacred arts, and Catholic Relief Services will receive support for a pilot program that seeks to deepen the understanding of Catholic social teaching among U.S. seminarians. Finally, the program continues its longstanding commitment to theological scholarship through renewed support of the Henry Luce III Fellows in Theology Program.
Association of Theological Schools in the U.S. and Canada, Pittsburgh, PA —To continue the Henry Luce III Fellows in Theology Program. A one-year grant of $600,000.

Catholic Relief Services, Baltimore, MD—To support a pilot program to deepen the understanding of Catholic social teaching among U.S. seminarians. A three-year grant of $330,000.

Central Baptist Theological Seminary, Shawnee, KS—Renewed support for joint initiatives with the Myanmar Institute of Theology. A three-year grant of $300,000.

Hartford Seminary, Hartford, CT—To support a new faculty member with expertise in Christian-Muslim relations. A four-year grant of $475,000.

Saint Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary, Yonkers, NY —To support a project on the sacred arts. A three-year grant of $250,000.

University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA—To support “Religion and its Publics,” a program at the Virginia Center for the Study of Religion. A three-year grant of $1,000,000.

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