Clare Boothe Luce

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Mount Holyoke CBL Assistant Professor of Computer Science Audrey Lee-St. John in her robotics lab with students.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do we need to be invited to submit an application?

An invitation is not required to submit an Information Form through our online portal; however, institutions should review the eligibility criteria and program documents prior to submitting an application. Institutions must be invited to submit full proposals for the second phase of the competition.

We had a previous Clare Boothe Luce award. Are we eligible to apply?

Current CBL grantees may not submit a new application before the current grant has been officially closed. Institutions with a prior CBL award may not apply for a new grant until five years after the award of their most recent grant (i.e., institutions that received CBL awards in 2014 or later are not eligible to apply for the 2018 competition).

Does the Clare Boothe Luce Program make awards directly to individuals (i.e., students, faculty)?

No, the Clare Boothe Luce Program makes grants only to U.S.-based, 4-year degree granting institutions, not directly to individuals. If you are a student, please check with your college or university to see if it has a Clare Boothe Luce grant. Please note that professorship grants are only for new faculty members, and cannot be used for existing faculty support.

Does the Clare Boothe Luce program make awards to community colleges?

No, the Clare Boothe Luce Program makes grants only to 4-year degree granting institutions.

Does an institution have to be top-ranked or an R-1 to apply for a CBL Program grant?

No, the Clare Boothe Luce Program awards grants to a range of 4-year year institutions that have demonstrated a strong commitment to the support of women in STEM. Please see the How to Apply page for detailed information on the CBL Program’s eligibility requirements.

Why are Catholic Institutions encouraged to apply?

According to the terms of Ambassador Luce’s bequest, at least 50% of the Program’s awards will go to Roman Catholic colleges or universities. This includes awards to the Designated Institutions.

What fields are supported by the Clare Boothe Luce Program?

Please see the list of included and excluded disciplines. Support is provided for women primarily in the physical sciences, such as chemistry and physics, and in computer science, mathematics, and engineering. Medical, social, and behavioral sciences are excluded.

Does the CBL program fund postdoctoral fellowships?

No, although the Clare Boothe Luce program pilot tested postdoctoral fellowships several years ago, the Program currently has no plans to support them. If that should change in the future, the CBL program webpage will be updated to reflect this.

May we propose to support more than the maximum number of awards noted?

Yes, to expand the number of recipients, other funds may be combined with the grant, as long as there is no other “naming” requirement. For example, schools may propose support for eight scholarships instead of four: four would be supported by Luce funds, and four would be supported by institutional funds.

Does the Clare Boothe Luce program have a matching funds requirement?

Yes, institutions applying for Clare Boothe Luce Program grants are encouraged to provide some match, or to demonstrate how institutional support will augment the benefits of the grant. The Selection Committee recognizes that resources vary by institution, and will take this into account in determining awards.

May Clare Boothe Luce grant funds be used for study or travel abroad?

No, Clare Boothe Luce funds may only be used for domestic study and travel.

Download the program brochure which includes a brief summary of the Clare Boothe Luce program guidelines and recipient category information.





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MIT Graduate Fellow in Physics Jenny Schloss works with a laser used to manipulate atoms.